We know voting is important, so let's actually do it

Elika Roohi/Sun Star Editor-in-Chief
October 9, 2012

It’s election season.  I know because during my Wednesday night class the guy beside me spent most of class lamenting the fact that he wasn’t playing the drinking game that went along with the first presidential debate- if you’re voting for Obama, drink on “middle class,” if you’re voting for Romney, drink on “ObamaCare.”  I’m not convinced that it’s the best way to become more educated about American politics, but it’s managed to get more interest in politics on campus than I’ve seen all year.

In the Regional Educational Attendance Area elections that took place last Tuesday, Oct. 2, there was an overall 18% voter turnout rate.

We all know that voting is important.  So why aren’t we doing it?

Granted, I didn’t vote in that election because I’m registered to vote in a community that wasn’t holding REAA elections.

However, I did spend an entire day running around town trying to find an absentee-in-person voting location for the primaries in August, since I turned in my absentee ballot request one day too late.  In those elections, there was an overall 25 percent voter turnout rate.

During the last presidential election, there was a 66 percent voter turn out rate in Alaska.

The larger elections tend to gather more attention and voters, when in reality it should be the other way around.  Statewide and local elections tend to be won more often by smaller margins, and your vote truly counts.

In ASUAF’s spring elections last year, a measly 203 students logged in with their ID number to pick the representatives that would be controlling a half million dollar budget that directly affects the student body at UAF.  If an 18 percent voter turnout record is bad for last week’s election, this is horrible.

It’s easy to forget how remarkable it is that our votes count.

Last spring, Egypt had their first ever presidential debate.  I remember listening to a professor who also worked as a journalist in Amman around that time.  Jordan is a monarchy with a parliament that’s elected and fired at the discretion of the king and a media that’s corralled into supporting the government.  Just knowing that their neighbors were having a debate, no matter the outcome, was enough to make her tear up, she told me.

During this week’s debate, there was a quick poll done on the reactions people in other countries were having to the two candidate’s verbal sparring.  According to NPR, citizens of China were barely even focusing on the debate going on between Mitt Romney and Barack Obama, but were spending more time looking at the picture of the constitution being shown in the background.  The take away being that the words between candidates are important, but the fact that we can host presidential debates is more important.

College students can be the difference in who’s put in office this year, and, I hate to say it, but we’re often overlooked.  I always wear my “I voted today” sticker with pride, and I hope to be seeing a lot them around campus come November.

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4 Responses

  1. peterpalms says:

    It makes no difference who is elected. In reality there are no parties justruling group members.
    The last time federal spending was reduced from one year to the next was a half-century ago, during the Eisenhower administration.
    Since then, it matters little which party is in office because both sides have increased spending. Each side also has a habit of meddling in foreign affairs, starting wars, borrowing without consideration, and both Democrats and Republicans support a limitless government and its intrusion in our lives.
    Your vote may make you feel good about our form of government, but if history is any sort of guide, it will have little effect on the nation’s direction. The sad truth is that the entity that controls our nation’s fate really isn’t in the White House, Senate or House of Representatives.
    Mayer Amschel Rothschild is credited with saying, “Give me control of a nation’s money and I care not who makes the law.”
    In the United States, our nation’s money is controlled by a handful of financiers operating an independent bank known as the U.S. Federal Reserve.
    If you are under the false impression that this bank is government controlled, think again.
    The legislation was drafted by a handful of private bankers. It was passed by an act of Congress on Dec. 23, 1913, and signed into law one hour later by President Woodrow Wilson.
    Our president does appoint the Federal Reserve chairman, however, neither he nor any other government entity, ratifies decisions made by the Federal Reserve.
    In other words, the power to destroy our nation’s currency and economy are in the hands of a very few. Unfortunately, these few are not chosen by the population they claim to assist.
    And perhaps before we go further, we should examine the results of nearly a century of Federal Reserve actions. Using the Consumer Price Index, we find that an item costing a dollar in 1913 would cost about $23.52 today.
    In other words, your buck has lost more than 95 percent of its value.
    If we based our calculations on gold, the picture is even bleaker with that same dollar worth now a little more than penny.
    What was once one of the soundest currencies on the planet, backed by gold and silver in 1913, is today backed by nothing other than our government’s authority to tax. Perhaps not so coincidentally, the Sixteenth Amendment (the income tax) was ratified just a few months before the Federal Reserve Act.
    We’ve been silently robbed through currency debasing since the moment the Fed began. Each subsequent manipulation, under benign names like “quantitative easing,” steals more of your money.
    Here is what Wilson said later about what he unknowingly helped bring into existence.
    “A great industrial nation is controlled by its system of credit. Our system of credit is privately concentrated. The growth of the nation, therefore, and all our activities are in the hands of a few men who, even if their action be honest and intended for the public interest, are necessarily concentrated upon the great undertakings in which their own money is involved and who necessarily, by very reason of their own limitations, chill and check and destroy genuine economic freedom.”
    And so as you step behind the ballot curtain and cast your vote for the next U.S. president, be prepared to be disappointed.
    The only power to change the direction of this country is found with the central bank. As long as these bankers continue to provide the politician’s with enough funny money to pay for their welfare and warfare, real change is exactly what you know it to be: an empty campaign slogan.

  2. peterpalms says:

    The last time federal spending was reduced from one year to the next was a half-century ago, during the Eisenhower administration.
    Since then, it matters little which party is in office because both sides have increased spending. Each side also has a habit of meddling in foreign affairs, starting wars, borrowing without consideration, and both Democrats and Republicans support a limitless government and its intrusion in our lives.
    Your vote may make you feel good about our form of government, but if history is any sort of guide, it will have little effect on the nation’s direction. The sad truth is that the entity that controls our nation’s fate really isn’t in the White House, Senate or House of Representatives.
    Mayer Amschel Rothschild is credited with saying, “Give me control of a nation’s money and I care not who makes the law.”
    In the United States, our nation’s money is controlled by a handful of financiers operating an independent bank known as the U.S. Federal Reserve.
    If you are under the false impression that this bank is government controlled, think again.
    The legislation was drafted by a handful of private bankers. It was passed by an act of Congress on Dec. 23, 1913, and signed into law one hour later by President Woodrow Wilson.
    Our president does appoint the Federal Reserve chairman, however, neither he nor any other government entity, ratifies decisions made by the Federal Reserve.
    In other words, the power to destroy our nation’s currency and economy are in the hands of a very few. Unfortunately, these few are not chosen by the population they claim to assist.
    And perhaps before we go further, we should examine the results of nearly a century of Federal Reserve actions. Using the Consumer Price Index, we find that an item costing a dollar in 1913 would cost about $23.52 today.
    In other words, your buck has lost more than 95 percent of its value.
    If we based our calculations on gold, the picture is even bleaker with that same dollar worth now a little more than penny.
    What was once one of the soundest currencies on the planet, backed by gold and silver in 1913, is today backed by nothing other than our government’s authority to tax. Perhaps not so coincidentally, the Sixteenth Amendment (the income tax) was ratified just a few months before the Federal Reserve Act.
    We’ve been silently robbed through currency debasing since the moment the Fed began. Each subsequent manipulation, under benign names like “quantitative easing,” steals more of your money.
    Here is what Wilson said later about what he unknowingly helped bring into existence.
    “A great industrial nation is controlled by its system of credit. Our system of credit is privately concentrated. The growth of the nation, therefore, and all our activities are in the hands of a few men who, even if their action be honest and intended for the public interest, are necessarily concentrated upon the great undertakings in which their own money is involved and who necessarily, by very reason of their own limitations, chill and check and destroy genuine economic freedom.”
    And so as you step behind the ballot curtain and cast your vote for the next U.S. president, be prepared to be disappointed.
    The only power to change the direction of this country is found with the central bank. As long as these bankers continue to provide the politician’s with enough funny money to pay for their welfare and warfare, real change is exactly what you know it to be: an empty campaign slogan.

  3. peterpalms says:

    Lets not kid each other. It is most likely too late to make any difference who is elected.

  4. Sundog says:

    Imagine an election with no electioneering. No campaigning. Where those elected are chosen for their character and commitment to the good of the whole. Yes….we should participate by voting. But what we have today is a broken system. We deserve better. There is a better way! Stay tuned!

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