Nanofluid… wonderfluid?

Ben Deering / Sun Star Reporter
August 31, 2010

Ever wonder where all that grant money goes that UAF receives each year?  The Department of Energy plans to disburse $617,583 of their funds for nanofluid research at UAF.

Professor Debendra Das, of the College of Engineering and Mines, has been working with a peculiar fluid designed to revolutionize how society deals with heat. This fluid has several interesting properties which will hopefully allow it to replace traditional cooling systems; it has a high heat coefficient, thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and viscosity.

Nanofluid is currently being looked at as an alternative to standard cooling systems, allowing said systems to be built more compact and more efficient. A smaller cooling system means less money spent on making the vehicle in the first place.

In addition, if nanofluid replaces traditional fluids in heating systems in Alaska, it can lower energy bills. Because nanofluid has a higher viscosity than water, it can be pumped about the building for less electricity than it would take to pump the same amount of water.

Nanofluid also has potential in medicine. A recent technique in removing tumors involves injecting nanofluid and nanopowder (small particles that can only be seen via electron microscope) into a tumor, allowing the particles to attack and remove the tumor without chemotherapy.

 

 

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