Symposium highlights 100 years of science

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The Centennial Science and Stewardship Symposium on Oct. 19 through 21 in the Wood Center will feature science done in Alaska through history. Collaring a grizzly bear in Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve as part of a multi-year study of grizzly bear habitat use and diet. Photo Courtesy of National Park Service/ David Gustine

Why should scientists be just as skilled at crafting a good Tweet as writing good journal articles? This is one question to be answered in a session of the Centennial Science and Stewardship Symposium on Oct. 19 – 21.

The National Park Service Alaska Region will be hosting the Symposium at UAF. The event will go over the ways that science and scholarship have shaped the past century of national park management. The symposium will be composed of sessions featuring research and stewardship in national parks.

“There’s something for everyone, it’s a really wide scope of presentations that are available, so I encourage people to check out the program online,” National Parks Service Science Communicator Nina Chambers said. “It’s fairly informal, there’s no charge, we just are happy to share the information and really encourage people to stop by.”

Presentations range a variety of topics relevant to science, scholarship and park management. Presentations that emphasize interdisciplinary themes are encouraged according to the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States website. Sessions will span the disciplines of natural resources, cultural resources, subsistence, education and outreach.

It’s an opportunity to celebrate the Park’s 100 years of activity by looking at the body of science that Alaska has and applying that knowledge to the future, according to Chambers.

The last Science and Stewardship Symposium was in the fall of 2005 when the 8th World Wilderness Congress met in Anchorage, according to the Arctic Research Consortium website.

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The Centennial Science and Stewardship Symposium on Oct. 19 through 21 in the Wood Center will feature science done in Alaska through history. An international team of researchers excavate an 800-1,000 year old archaeology site at Cape Espenberg. Photo Courtesy of National Park Service/ Andrew Tremayne

There are five different tracks: climate science, science tools and applications, cultural dimensions, wildlife and science communication

The Parks Service is really hoping that UAF students will come to the event, which is why the event will be on campus and registration is free, according to Chambers.

“I think it’s a really great opportunity to interact with scientists,” Chambers said. “If you’re young in your career and are interested in any of the science that we’re doing it’s a really great opportunity to listen to some of the sessions and get to know some of the parks service scientists and university scientists and United States Geological Survey scientists.”

All of the Symposium’s activities will be in the Wood Center, with the exception of two evening sessions which will be in the Schaible Auditorium. The first one is about what scientists do in the field. The second one is a film festival on Oct. 20, showing around 2 hours of short films. On Friday there will be tours of the permafrost tunnels, the Large Animal Research Station or the Museum of the North depending on interest. The full event schedule can be found here.

“The evening sessions especially for families to come and hear stories and watch the film festival, I think those are the best opportunities for the public,” Chambers said.

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  1. October 2, 2016

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